Monday, December 26, 2016

Chia can help with diabetes and weight loss

A recent study, reported in the Journal of Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, which utilized 60 people half of which were in the control group, showed that consuming 30 grams of chia a day for 6 months reduced C-reactive protein, waste circumference and weight. 

This study once again demonstrates that daily consumption of chia can have significant health benefits not only in those suffering from diabetes, but also those that are overweight.

Have you had your chia today?®

Monday, November 7, 2016

FDA guidelines for claiming omega3 content in foods - chia can be considered a high source of omega3 (ALA)

In January of 2016 the FDA issued new guidance rules for what claims can be made for the omega3 nutrient content of foods. 

Specifically claims for DHA and EPA are not allowed, with the FDA stating: "We are prohibiting the nutrient content claims for DHA and EPA set forth in the three notifications because they are not based on an authoritative statement that identifies a nutrient level to which the claims refer, as required by the FD&C Act."

However they did allow nutrient content claims for ALA (the type of omega3 found in chia) with HIGH being allowed for ≥ 320 mg of ALA per RACC (≥ 20% of 1.6 g/day) and GOOD SOURCE for ≥ 160 mg of ALA per RACC (≥ 10% of 1.6 g/day) where RACC stands for: "reference amount customarily consumed".

Thus one can easily say that according to FDA guidelines, chia has a HIGH content of omega3 per 15 gm serving, since it contains approximately 2900 gm of ALA which is almost 10 times the required amount.

Have you had your chia today?®

Thursday, June 30, 2016

ALA omega3 (the type found in chia) can help prevent fatal heart attacks

A study just published in the Journal of the American Medical Association has concluded that ALA (the type of omega3 found in chia) can reduce the risk of fatal heart attacks. This study also supports the fact that the omega3 found in fish (DHA and EPA) can also reduce the effect of fatal heart attacks. The authors stated that the ALA marker was associated with a 9% reduced risk of a fatal heart attack, while the EPA and DHA marker was associated with a 10% reduced risk.

Clearly this refutes earlier studies that had said consuming ALA was ineffective in regards to reducing coronary heart issues.